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1finny Posted on 12/03/2018 18:39
Edited On: 12/03/2018 18:58How can Stokes plead Not Gulity to affray
 
 
Affray is effectively ‘fighting in public’.
He may be able to claim all sorts - provocation etc but it looks from the evidence he was, indeed, fighting in public [?]
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Dundas_Arcade Posted on 12/03/2018 18:43

How can Stokes plead Not Gulity to afraid?

 
Perhaps he wasn't afraid ?

Perhaps he is cable of challenging a taxi driver, unlike you [:o)]

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since1970 Posted on 12/03/2018 18:46

How can Stokes plead Not Gulity to afraid?

 
[8)][:D]
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Dave_ Posted on 12/03/2018 18:48

How can Stokes plead Not Gulity to afraid?

 
Cos he's a brave lad!

LOLOLOL
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1finny Posted on 12/03/2018 19:00

How can Stokes plead Not Gulity to afraid?

 
Ey up Dundas
Lovely to have you around [:X]
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kuepper Posted on 12/03/2018 19:19

How can Stokes plead Not Gulity to affray

 
He will have listened to what his highly paid QC has said to him, presumably the QC must think he's a better than 50% chance of being found not guilty. Probably based on the technicality of the particular charge. Will probably use same brief as Gerrard did and got off in similar circumstances tho the video clearly showed him beating up someone just like Stokes seems to have done.
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jcjc Posted on 12/03/2018 22:33

How can Stokes plead Not Gulity to affray

 
cant believe he is playing for england
we obviously condone this type of behaviour
should be in jail now
reminisent of boyer thing at leeds
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CheshireBoro Posted on 12/03/2018 22:50

How can Stokes plead Not Gulity to affray

 
His lawyer (not a QC) is a mate of mine.

Whilst I dont claim to know the ins and outs, there is an awful lot of stuff that happened inside the venue, on CCTV that hasnt been released. That is the basis for his defence.

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CheshireBoro Posted on 12/03/2018 22:51

How can Stokes plead Not Gulity to affray

 
His lawyer (not a QC) is a mate of mine.

Whilst I dont claim to know the ins and outs, there is an awful lot of stuff that happened inside the venue, on CCTV that hasnt been released. That is the basis for his defence.

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chiz62 Posted on 13/03/2018 07:13
Edited On: 13/03/2018 07:13
How can Stokes plead Not Gulity to affray

 
What he will be hoping for ,will be the jury ignoring the law and looking at him sympatheticly,As he he stopped a group of lads kicking the sh#t out of 2 gay men.
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Billy_Horner Posted on 13/03/2018 10:24

How can Stokes plead Not Gulity to affray

 
If he can show that he did stop a group of lads from kicking the sh!t out of 2 gay men, then the jury wouldn't be ignoring the law if they found him not guilty, would they?
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myfooty Posted on 13/03/2018 10:48

How can Stokes plead Not Gulity to affray

 
What’s the Difference between a Lawyer, a Solicitor and a Barrister?

The term Lawyer is a generic term used to describe anyone who is a Licensed Legal Practitioner qualified to give legal advice in one or more areas of law. Put simply, Solicitors and Barristers are both types of Lawyer.

What is a Solicitor?

A Solicitor is a qualified legal professional who provides expert legal advice and support to clients. A Solicitor's clients can be individual people, groups, private companies or public sector organisations.

What does a Solicitor do?

After taking instructions from clients, Solicitors will advise on necessary courses of legal action depending on their areas of legal expertise. Most Solicitors in the UK are primarily litigators, although many Solicitors specialise in specific areas of law and some do their own advocacy cases.

Solicitors work directly with clients and although specific work activities will naturally depend on the Solicitor’s area of expertise, they typically involve conversing with clients to establish their firm’s suitability to provide the necessary legal advice and services, taking the client’s instructions and then advising them on the law and legal issues relating to their particular case.

Solicitors deal with all the paperwork and communication involved with their clients' cases, such as writing documents, letters and contracts tailored to their client’s needs; ensuring the accuracy of legal advice and procedure, and preparing papers for Court.

Solicitors will also negotiate with clients and opposing parties to secure agreed objectives, gather evidence, supervise the implementation of agreements, calculate claims for damages, compensation, loss of earnings, maintenance etc., and co-ordinate the work of all parties involved in the case. Their work ranges across the whole spectrum of legal work from high value commercial work to personal injury cases, family law issues such as children law and divorce, criminal law and wills probate and the general administration of estates. 

Solicitors represent clients in disputes and represent them in Court if necessary. In complex disputes however, Solicitors will often instruct Barristers or specialist advocates to appear in Court on behalf of their clients.

If a case goes to Court, it is unlikely that a Solicitor will represent their client although certain Solicitors can appear in Court as advocates. Instead, a Solicitor will generally refer the work to a Barrister or specialist advocate for expert advice or to instruct them to appear in Court to represent the client.

What is a Barrister?

A Barrister generally provides specialist legal advice and represents individual people and organisations in Courts and tribunals and through written legal advice.

What does a Barrister do?

In general, Barristers in England & Wales are hired by Solicitors to represent a case in Court and only become involved once advocacy before a Court is needed. The role of a Barrister is to "translate and structure their client's view of events into legal arguments and to make persuasive representations which obtain the best possible result for their client."

Barristers usually specialise in particular areas of law such as criminal law, chancery law (estates and trusts), commercial law, entertainment law, sports law and common law; which includes family law and divorce, housing and personal injury law.

Although a Barrister’s work will vary considerably depending on their level of expertise and the area of law in which they practice, they will typically advise clients on the law and the strength of their case and provide them with a written ‘opinion’. Barristers will advocate on behalf of their clients and the client’s Solicitor in Court, presenting their case, examining and cross-examining witnesses and giving reasons why the Court should support the case. They will then negotiate settlements with the other side.

Out of the estimated 15,500 Barristers practising in England & Wales, around 80% are self-employed. Other Barristers are employed, for example, in Solicitors' firms advising clients directly, or in agencies such as the Crown Prosecution Service (CPS), or in specialist legal departments in industry, commerce, charities or central or local government; advising only the organisations they work for.

On the whole, self-employed Barristers work in offices known as Chambers which they may share with other Barristers. After completing their training, many gain permanent positions known as tenancy in a ‘set’ of Chambers.

As Barristers within a Chambers are all independent from one another they can often act on different sides in the same legal dispute. In contrast, Solicitors working at the same law firm would be prevented from doing the same as there would be a conflict of interest.

Barristers are kept independent and prevented from picking and choosing the cases they want to work on by what is known as the Cab Rank Rule. The Cab Rank Rule prohibits a Barrister from refusing a case if, for example, they found the nature of the case objectionable or if they think the client has unacceptable conduct, opinions or beliefs or simply due to the source of the funding.

Generally self-employed Barristers cannot be instructed directly by clients as they first need to be briefed by a Solicitor. However, the exception to this is if the barrister is a member of the Public Access Scheme which enables a member of the public to go directly to a Barrister for legal advice or representation.
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1finny Posted on 13/03/2018 11:20

How can Stokes plead Not Gulity to affray

 
Barristers, I think, also take their clients plea and follow their lead. They don’t advise on the client’s guilt

It’s a good point that if he was shown to stop them beating up a gay lad then he will be ok.

Tricky one tho - He still fought in a public place (which is the potential crime).
The CPS, by the way, take the view that if there is a more than 50% chance of guilt they go to trial.

If they thought he was merely being a good citizen - they probably would have backed off.

Lets see eh?
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Indeedido Posted on 13/03/2018 11:23

How can Stokes plead Not Gulity to affray

 
myfooty - helpful for me thanks[^]
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